Restriction of marketing to children

The Stop Marketing to Kids Coalition

A national coalition advocating for restrictions on food and beverage marketing to children and youth is launching today, February 24, 2016 at the Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance of Canada (CDPAC) annual conference. Co-led by the Heart and Stroke Foundation and the Childhood Obesity Foundation, the Stop Marketing to Kids Coalition says the time has come to protect children and to support parents to make healthy decisions for their families. The coalition has developed the Ottawa Principles, which outline the policy recommendation of restricting commercial marketing of all food and beverages to children and youth 16 and under, with marketing being defined as any means of advertising or promoting products or services. The restrictions would not apply to non-commercial marketing for valid public health education or public awareness campaigns. The Ottawa Principles also include a set of definitions, scope, and principles to guide policy development.

Ottawa Principles

Definitions and Scope 

1. Marketing refers to any form of commercial communication or message that is designed to, or has the effect of, increasing the recognition, appeal and/or consumption of particular products and services. It comprises anything that acts to advertise or otherwise promote a product or service.

2. Restrictions would apply to all food and beverages.

3. Restrictions do not relate to non-commercial marketing for valid public health education or public awareness campaigns.

4. The age at which restrictions in marketing to children would apply should be 16 years and younger.

Policy Recommendation 

Restrict the commercial marketing of all food and beverages to children and youth age 16 years and younger. Restrictions would include all forms of marketing with the exception of non-commercial marketing for public education. In addition, the regulations should fulfill the nine Ottawa Principles.

The Childhood Obesity Foundation endorses the policy recommendation above.

More information about the Stop Marketing to Kids Coalition including a mechanism for concerned Canadians to send their member of parliament a letter supporting restrictions on food and beverage marketing to kids, is available at the coalition website at www.stopmarketingtokids.ca

View the press release here.

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LIVE 5-2-1-0!

5

or more veggies and fruit per day

 

2
no more than two hours of screen time a day

1
hour of physical activity or more per day

0

no sugary drinks